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Unas
Unas Pyramid
Famine
Scene of people starving from famine
Rule:5th Dynasty: 2353-2323 BC
Predecessor:- His relationship with his predecessor Djedkare is unknown. This fact along with the innovations in his pyramid complex and the use of blocks from his predecessor's monuments in his own project, have led to speculations that Unas was the real founder of the 6th Dynasty.
Consorts:- Both of Unas' Queens Khenut and Nebit were buried in mastabas outside his pyramid complex. This was unusual for the time, since Queens were buried in subsidiary pyramids within the complex itself.
The small mastaba of Nebit contains reliefs of her in a harem in the palace.
Capital City:Memphis
Reign:- Despite his long reign, not much is known about this Pharaoh
- Trade with neighboring regions flourished during his reign. An inscription at Elephantine shows a giraffe brought from Africa with other exotic animals.
- Reliefs at his pyramid complex show a famine that occurred during his reign, people are shown skeletal and unusual for royal reliefs. The starving people show the reality of life in Egypt at this time, which finally led to the eclipse of the Old Kingdom
- The mummy of Iput his daughter was found in a large mastaba, her skeleton was found intact, along with a necklace, a gold bracelet and the 5 canopic jars. The mastaba had 10 rooms decorated with agricultural scenes, and was later transformed into a pyramid by Pepi 1 (her son)
- Teti 1 married his daughter Iput, in order to legitimize his claim to the throne, and founded the 6th Dynasty.
Burial:- He is mostly known for his pyramid in Saqqara, which was the first one to be decorated with Pyramid Texts
This pyramid is located northwest of Djoser's Step Pyramid, and is now in ruins
Successor:- He didn't leave a heir when he died, and there was a short period of political instability, but eventually he was succeeded by his son in law, Teti 1
Wikipedia:Unas
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Photos: Unas Pyramid

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